Overnight Oats 🍌🥣


I was on a vegan cookbook kick for a while, amassing all sorts of reference material for the one week that I tried being completely vegan (you can’t eat out *at all* unless you know the chef). It wasn’t difficult as long as I didn’t try to substitute anything for cheese. People try to tell you (themselves, really) that cheese substitutes are a sufficient facsimile, and they’re just not. The only thing that comes reasonably close is Minimalist Baker’s Vegan Parm. I still use this instead of that jarred parm that isn’t even mostly cheese to begin with.

ANYHOOOOO, along the way somewhere, I started making these overnight oats for my weekly morning snack and I’ve been making it since that vegan trial week in May 2016.

I’m not a fan of the green banan.

Grab yourself a banana, peel, halve, sprinkle with cinnamon and smash.

This recipe (three servings) fits neatly in a 3-cup Glasslock container. Do yourself a favor and get a whole set.

Using my trusty Pampered Chef Measure-All, I slide it to the 1-cup mark and pour in the oats.

Then, I slide it to 1/4-cup and measure the chia seeds.

Ch-ch-ch-chia.

I get nervous Every. Single. Time. that I’m going to knock it over and chia seeds will be everywhere in the kitchen for 100 years. Those go in, and I flip the Measure-All over and pour in 1 1/2-cups of almond milk. I didn’t get a shot of this cuz… boring.

Stir it up. Come on now, stir it up.

Mix it all together and put your snap-tight lid on and leave it in the fridge overnight. In the morning, you’ll need to give it a good stir.

Settled oats.

Then, I top it with frozen blues from Costco. The ones that fall on the floor become dog treats, but you knew that already.

Then I pack as much as I can into a jar and continue on with the rest of my snacks.

Overnight Oats

A quick and healthful snack.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Breakfast
Servings: 3 snacks

Ingredients

  • 1 banana
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 c Bob's Red Mill Oats not quick-cooking, steel-cut, or extra thick
  • 1/4 c chia seeds
  • 1 1/2 c almond milk
  • 3/4 c frozen blueberries

Instructions

  • Peel the banana and cover with cinnamon. Smash until it becomes a mix.
  • Pour oats, chia seeds, and milk over and stir.
  • Leave in the refrigerator overnight (get it?).
  • Int he morning, mix in the blueberries.

Chrissy’s Tom Yum 🍜 🍤


I treated myself to Chrissy’s 2nd book, Cravings, Hungry for More and, of course, started out by making one of the most difficult recipes in it. In fact, she cites that this one is ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT RECIPES IN HER LIFE.

It’s in the Thai Mom chapter, which makes sense if you’ve ever seen, smelled, or tasted Tom Yum. There are some “weird” ingredients, but I contend that if you know where to find them and have them in your kitchen, you may think of a whole new palette of food to which you can add some oomph.

The weirdish ingredients are lemongrass, Thai chiles, galangal, fish sauce, and kaffir lime leaves. They are worth the scavenger hunt if you’re not in a city with a Thai bodega or somewhere not a traditional grocery store. Although, the lines are blurring with “traditional” and “ethnic” stores. I prefer, however, to go to Viet Hoa under the guise of needing lemongrass and leaving with that, a cleaver, and yet another soup bowl.

Thankfully, I already had kaffir lime leaves saved in the freezer from some other very adventurous dish, and the fish sauce never (?) goes bad. Woodman’s has started carrying Thai chiles, and you can substitute ginger for galangal. So, really all I needed from Viet Hoa was the lemongrass. Oops!

All the veggies.

After the chopping, the dish is pretty simple to put together except for the Thai chiles… I didn’t want to have to wash the food processor, and super-fine-knife-chopping isn’t my fort√©, so I got to pull out the mortar and pestle, which I’m pretty sure has been used one time. Ever.

Thai chiles, garlic, shallot.

A very brief time later, it became obvious that I wasn’t going to make a paste, and did it really matter? Who knows. I was tired of wearing nylon gloves.

Happily, I had some leftover noodles from a box of Costco soups that we just didn’t get around to finishing. So, as Chrissy suggests, I saved the flavor packets and used the two bags of noodles. The peeled shrimp get thrown in at the end and cook for a couple of minutes.

Now we feast!

A hot, lime, lemon, garlic, ginger, mushroom, shrimp, noodle heaven.

Get her book and treat yo’ self to this dish. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed!

Review: Winco FST-6

There was a Facebook meme or a Tweet or some other such thing that suggests, “Welcome to adulthood. You have a favorite spatula now.”

I’m here to introduce you to my favorite (and hopefully your soon-to-be favorite) spatula. This is the Winco FST-6.

This is the best spatula, folks!

I can only assume FST means “Fancy Spatula Turner” or “Fishy Slippy Turny”, but whatever the case may be, it’s the greatest thing in my kitchen right now, and it’s not just for fish.

The Amazon description makes it sound like the blade itself is 11″, but it’s 6.5″ (which is maybe what the -6 is in the product title?), and that’s pretty much all you need for flipping hashbrowns and turkey bacon, relieving sunny-side-up eggs from your “metal tools are safe here!” pan, and possibly flipping a salmon or two.

The stainless steel blade is sturdy and the end has an edge so you can get up under those perfect whites without fear of breaking the wonderfully-runny yolks.

Have I mentioned I’ve perfected the sunny-side egg?

At a mere $6.20 (at the time of this writing), it’s worth a try! I actually just looked into setting up a product giveaway for two lucky readers, but the minimum number of entrants was 200 and I don’t have that kind of audience yet.

Seitan Gyros! 🥙


Seitan isn’t for the faint of heart; nor the gluten-intolerant. It’s made from wheat gluten, the endosperm of the wheat berry, to be precise. Wheat gluten is chock full of protein and, when cooked, makes a really nice meaty substitute. You can also use it as a binder for vegetarian meatballs or meatloaf. Maybe I’ll put that on the “To Make” list.

My favorite seitan recipe comes from Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day. I made quite a few modifications, both because I wanted to be able to publish the recipe and because it’s not gyro-specific.

The one thing I miss from eating four-legged-meats 100 years ago is a Zorba’s gyro (they were waaaay better than Parthenon’s). The peppery meat constantly turning and dripping and shaved to order onto an olive-oily pita, topped with onions that were too big, lots of tomatoes, and dripping with tzatziki sauce. Of course, the fries were required to soak up the drips. One barely needed any ketchup.

Anyhoo. Seitan! It’s some wheat gluten, nooch, a little bitta chickpea flour and lots of yummy seasonings. I didn’t take pictures of this process because, well, it’s not very photogenic.

Once the seitan is done and cooled (a process that takes 8 hours to cook and about the same to cool), you slice it up and grill it in a pan. I ended up squirting it with Bragg’s Aminos, which provides the saltiness that soy sauce has, but it’s “better for you”.

While that’s cooking or even the day before, the tzatziki sauce can be prepped (most things are better after sitting around in the fridge for a while). I used a small container of fat-free Fage Greek yogurt, a little bit of cucumber, dried and minced garlic, and some lemon juice.

Chop an onion and a tomato and heat the pitas over the burner and you’ve got yourself a delicious facsimile of a Zorba’s gyro. Minus the yelling and grease.

Waiting for seitan.
All set!
Om nom nom.

Seitan Gyros

YEE-ROHS
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time25 mins
Seitan Cook and Cool Time14 hrs
Course: Main Course
Servings: 4

Equipment

  • Slow cooker
  • Food processor

Ingredients

Seitan

  • 2 c vital wheat gluten
  • 3 Tbsp chickpea flour
  • 4 Tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1/4 c onion
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 drop liquid smoke
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 2 Tbsp ketchup
  • 1 1/4 c vegetable broth chilled
  • 6 c vegetable broth chilled

Tzatziki

  • 6 oz plain, fat-free, Greek yogurt
  • 3 Tbsp cucumber seeded and diced
  • 1 garlic clove minced
  • 2 tsp lemon juice

Gyro

  • pitas
  • white onion sliced
  • tomato diced

Instructions

Seitan

  • In a large bowl, combine the flours and nutritional yeast.
  • Put everything else (except the broth) into a food processor and combine.
  • Mix the spices into the dry ingredients and add the 1 1/4 cus of broth to mix everything together. If it's too wet, add more gluten, if it's too dry, add more broth.
    When it's all combined, make it into a loaf-shape and wrap with cheesecloth to keep it that way. Place into a slow cooker and cover with the remaining 6 cups of broth. Cook on low for 8 hours. Let it cool in the broth.

Tzatziki

  • Mix everything together. Let it rest.

Gyros

  • Slice the seitan into meatly shapes and cook in a grill pan over medium until it's crispy on the edges. Spritz with Bragg's Aminos for color and salt.
  • Heat the pitas in a toaster oven or on the stovetop. Assemble with seitan first, sauce, onions, tomatoes. Serve with extra napkins.

How-to Pesto 🌱


My neighbor just got a bunch of really nice landscaping done on the side of her house that I can’t see. The other night, she brought me over to show me all the basil and mint and thyme and wonderfulness that she had put in. It’s not all edible, but most of it is.

Anyway, she said, “take all the basil you want!” referring to a holy basil bush that was roughly the size of a kitchen table. I said that I would because I was seeing my mom for brunch the next day and she loves holy basil. Well, apparently, mom has enough of it, too.

This morning, I got a text that neighbor had left some on the back porch. I replied that I looked forward to turning it into pesto.

That bottom board is 14″x11″.

After 136 years of picking leaves off stems, I ended up filling the 2 qt. Pampered Chef mixing bowl.

Lotsa basil!

I cleaned up a bit and assessed the pesto ingredient needs, pulling the lemon juice, pine nuts, and parm out of the fridge. I decided to use EVOO instead of another fancy oil. I popped three garlic cloves off the head and peeled them.

Since the food processor will be busy making swift work of the basil and pine nuts, it’s best if you use the smaller side of the cheese grater for the parm.

Unfortunately, I don’t have any action shots because I was mostly worried about how I was going to get all of this pesto made without it taking another 136 years.

I scooped two loose handfuls into the Hamilton Beach 8 Cup Food Processor, sprinkled some lemon juice, tossed in a garlic clove, poured in about 1/8th of a cup of pine nuts, and did a swoosh of oil. These steps were repeated three times until I ran out of basil and did one last spin with salt and pepper added.

Tame and perfect.

I haven’t made pesto in a long time, and don’t care at all for the jarred variety (it’s too oily and salty). This turned out, if I may say so, perfect.

Cubes for freezing.

Added bonus: it was exactly enough to fill one of my silicone ice cube trays.

Before I cleaned off the cutting boards, I harvested enough basil seeds to plant next year with our bucket tomatoes.

Basil Pesto

Prep Time45 mins
Mix Time10 mins
Servings: 15 recipes

Equipment

  • Food processor

Ingredients

  • 2 qt basil leaves
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 c pine nuts
  • 1/2 c Parmesan grated, small
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • salt to taste
  • pepper to taste

Instructions

  • In batches, combine a third of everything in an 8-cup food processor three times until all the basil is incorporated.
  • Add salt and pepper to taste (remembering that you're probably going to put this into a dish with more salt and pepper).
  • Scoop into a freezer-safe container of your choice.