Air Fried Bagels

This is my first foray into video. It didn’t take very long to record, but it took a long time to edit, and I think the sound is kinda awful and now I know why people have their ingredients premeasured (the clinking and clanking annoys even me if you can believe it!).

Give it a look-see. Buy the cookbook and the air fryer and go to town!

Kick the Cold Curry 🍛🥦🥕🥵



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We’ve been trying Imperfect Foods for a couple of months now and I’ve found it to be convenient and I like seeing what the “imperfections” are and then getting mad that people don’t know that misshapen sweet potatoes taste exactly the same as regular ones. It can be a bit of a game, too, figuring out the savings over Woodman’s since there’s a shipping cost involved. Anyhoo, that link up there will get us both $10 off if you sign up.

Why did I tell you about that? Because I had a head of broccoli from Imperfect that needed to be used up and a craving for antioxidants. Weird, I know.

Some of the stars of the show.

The picture above contains only a few of the actors in this delicious musical. I added garlic powder, turmeric, red pepper flakes, cayenne pepper, a little almond butter, and another carrot (the one looked lonely).

To start, the diced aromatics go into some heated coconut oil until translucent. I then added all of the spices and seasonings, including some agave nectar, along with a tablespoon of that delicious bouillon (the vegetarian style is as good!) along with about a cup of water. This results in the magical concentrate of a germ-killing concoction.

Fear the curry!

It doesn’t look super pretty, but the best things are not.

To this, add a can of coconut milk. I’m not really sure the tastable difference between light and regular, but I had a can of not-light and used it happily. The solids that hang out at the top of the can will melt eventually. I find it looks like a barista trying to make a latte.

Look, a scorpion!

Once the seasonings, spices, flavor, and milk are melded together, add the vegetables and bring to a simmer.

We are drawn to the color of things.

After it’s got a good simmer goin’ on, turn the heat down a bit, cover, and set a 10-minute timer.

As done as done needs.

Serve, eat, enjoy, relish, share, comfort, be.

Coconut Curry Veggies

Packed full of germ-fighting spices and vegetables, you'll feel amazing (at least) while eating it!
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Course: Main Course
Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1/2 c onion chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • water
  • 1 Tbsp Better Than Bouillon chicken or mushroom
  • 1 Tbsp curry paste
  • 1 tsp agave nectar
  • 1 15 oz can coconut milk
  • 2 c broccoli florets
  • 2 carrots cut into coins
  • 1 15 oz can chickpeas drained and rinsed

Instructions

  • Melt the coconut oil over medium and add the onions and garlic when ready. Stir and cook until onions are translucent (about 5 minutes).
  • Add all of the dry spices, then the bouillon, agave nectar, curry paste, and water. Stir until combined.
  • Stir in coconut water and the solid cream. Once incorporated, add the broccoli, carrots, and chickpeas. Stir it up and bring to a simmer. Cover and set a 10-minute timer.
  • Serve over your favorite kind of rice or with naan.

Salade de Betteraves et Chèvre


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Saying chèvre like an annoying American is funny to me. Probably because I know a few French words but not enough to be useful, like when looking for the bathroom or asking for a beer. However, I distinctly recall learning my first French swear-word: at the end of 9 to 5, the boss’ assistant was coming back from her trip to France and said, “merde.” In fact, I think I learned a great deal about life from that film.

I digress.

This salad was born of an overabundance of beets and the desire to have Grampa’s PIzzeria‘s beet salad without leaving the house. Seriously, it’s the best beet salad ever.

Second best?

Preheat the oven to 400º and grab your knife. After honing, cut the top and bottom off the beets. Depending on your zero-waste level, throw the beet greens in with the rest of the salad, save ’em to make a pesto, or compost ’em.

Put the beets into foil pockets and drizzle, spray, or otherwise apply some kind of oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 45-60 minutes. Check with a fork after 45, even tho I’m not sure it’s possible to “over roast” a beet.

Cute little beet pockets.

Now that I look at that photo, I realize it’s not at all necessary to individually package the beets; a simple foil tube would be just fine. But, this makes them feel more special. Once you can poke a fork in ’em without much resistance, they can come out and cool down. It’s not proof of any super-powers if you can peel a beet that’s 400º ON THE OUTSIDE. Since they are plated relatively room temp, you could roast the day before or hours before you’re ready for dinner.

The rest of the salad is whatever you want. We’ve been digging these greens from Wisconsin (Woodman’s just started carrying this brand) because you can tell they didn’t sit on a truck for a week on their way up to the northern states. Slice up some red onion, cucumber, radish. Toss in a bowl with olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. This time around, I added pine nuts and hemp hearts because I was feeling like we needed more crunch.

When the salad is well coated, plate and set aside.

This is a salad that can hold its own.

Now comes the magic part: cheese. But, not just any cheese. Goat cheese. And, not just ANY goat cheese. AIR-FRIED GOAT CHEESE in BALL SHAPE!

I regret that I don’t have pictures of the process because it’s a two-handed one, and it’s messy, and my iPhone isn’t insured.

Preheat your air fryer and get your separate whisked-egg and panko bowls ready.

Take the log of chèvre and cut pieces to shape into balls slightly smaller than the size of a ping-pong. If we’re using food for reference, you’re looking for a bocconcini-sized ball, not ovaline.

Coat with egg, coat with panko. Repeat.

When the fryer is hot, pull out the basket and lightly spray with avocado oil. Place each cheese ball so they’re not touching and “fry” for about eight minutes. When done, carefully scoop each ball out with a spoon and place gently on the salad like a rescued bird’s egg into its nest.

Dive in!

Salad with Beets and Goat Cheese

A delicious salad with the added wonderfulness of beets and "fried" cheese.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Cooling Time30 mins
Servings: 2

Equipment

  • Air Fryer

Ingredients

Salad

  • 3 handfuls salad greens
  • 1/3 c red onion sliced
  • 1/3 c cucumber sliced
  • 1 Tbsp pine nuts
  • 1 Tbsp hemp hearts
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • salt and pepper
  • 6 beets roasted

Cheese Balls

  • 4 oz goat cheese divided
  • 1/3 c panko
  • 1 egg whisked

Instructions

  • Roast the beets in foil with olive oil, salt, pepper for 45-60 minutes at 400º. Check with a fork and remove to cool. When cooled, peel under running water. Slice into quarters.
  • When nearly ready to eat, mix the rest of the salad ingredients together and plate. Top salad with quartered beets.
  • Put panko and egg in separate bowls. Ball up the goat cheese (the size is preference-based—we like 'em smaller) and dip in each bowl to coat.
  • After the air fryer is preheated (about five minutes), place cheese balls in the basket for eight minutes without flipping. Gently remove with a spoon and place it onto the salad.

Roast Chicky-Bird


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When I started chickening (in the last four years now—after having been vegetarian for nearly 20), I found these Smart Chicken whole birds at Woodman’s. Their gimmick (if you will) is they air-chill and don’t add water. I have no real idea what this means but can only assume you’re not paying for the weight of water when you buy their chickens.

I can also assume that they’re a pretty alright company because Jeni St Market switched from Bell and Evans (a very alright company) to Smart Chicken (because of some distro and stocking problems for the small store).

However, the whole fryers are usually somewhere between 2.5 and 3.5 lbs and are $10-13. The organic version of the bird is similarly sized but twice as much.

Thankfully, Woodman’s also carries birds that aren’t Tyson or Gold ‘n’ Plump. Namely, Gerber’s Amish Farm chickens. These hefty fellas are 4ish lbs and $7ish. Plus, you usually get a neck and a pair o’ kidneys, the use of which we’ll get to in another post about the best chicken gravy you will ever smell, make, or taste.

During these last four years of roasting chickens, I’ve settled on a way that incorporates a little from GOOP, Ottolenghi, and a new favorite, Sam the Cooking Guy, and I’m here to tell you all about it.

It’s at this point that I always thank the bird for letting us eat him.

You start out with a bird on your favorite raw-poultry-only cutting board and, instead of rinsing him off (which has been purported to simply spread the possibility of salmonella* around the kitchen), take a couple of paper towels and pat dry all over, getting in the pits and inside the cavity.

*It’s good to be safe because the effects of the bacteria mean you won’t be eating chicken any time in the near future.

Into the cavity, shove a couple of quartered lemons, and if there is room, cut the top off a head of garlic and put that in there, too.

Preheat the oven to 425° and get out your carbon-steel pan (or cooking sheet, or whatever you roast in).

Now, as the Joy of Cooking puts it so annoyingly, perform a simple truss! It’s never so simple, and I usually cut the string too short. But, I’ll attempt to explain it so maybe I can remember myself and can stop referencing the drawings in the book.

First, measure out at least two feet of string, but probably more, and start by wrapping the middle of the string around the Pope’s nose and give it a tie. Then, hold the two legs together (where there were once feet) and wrap the string around them so they’re very close, or even crossed. This is when I begin to lose patience; track the string under the thighs and up toward the wings. Some people (who cut their string long enough) wrap around the wings a couple of times, but in the reference photos, I appear to only have used the string to keep ’em close. Which is the point, really. You just don’t want them flapping about because they’ll burn.

All trussed up and nowhere to go. Except for the oven.
Sticking his neck out!

Tie the string at the neck and go wash your hands.

Mix equal parts garlic powder, salt (there’s a difference), and ground pepper and hold about 12 inches above the bird and sprinkle all over until it’s healthfully covered. The bird up there is shiny because he was spritzed with avocado oil, a practice I have since halted. They render enough juicy fat that really, no extra oil is needed.

That’s it! Stick him in the oven at 425° for 10 minutes, reduce the heat to 385° and after a total of 40 minutes, get out your baster and start basting. Tip the pan with the cavity opening toward you so you get the lemon juices and baste for a minute. Put the bird back in for another 30 minutes and then check the temperature of the thickest part of the thigh (avoiding the bone, which will be significantly hotter). You’re looking for 165° or higher. Though, I’ve read some chef claim he “likes [his] chicken a little pink” and thinks it’s fine at 150°. I do not.

Lately, I’ve been sticking a chef’s knife into the cavity and tilting it into the pan so the juices run out there instead of on my cutting board. This also allows me to use the grease plus lemon juice as an amazing salad dressing. I did get myself a not-raw-chicken board with a deeper well and a slant, so the juices run toward the back and not all over the counter. I’ve used it once and it worked swimmingly. Get it?! Swimming in chicken juice.

Ahem.

The next really important part here is to let the chicken rest for at least 10 minutes, 15 if you can stand it. This is why it’s good to temp the chicken higher (180°) because it’s going to sit for a while and you don’t want to serve lukewarm chicken.

The next post about chickens will be the carving process, which is made so much easier after it rests. The fibers settle down, the juices get settled where they need to, and it’s not going to burn your fingers.

Roasted Chicken

The easiest things since sliced bread.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time1 hr 10 mins
Resting Time15 mins
Total Time1 hr 45 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American

Ingredients

  • 1 4lb chicken patted dry
  • 1/2 lemon quartered
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper finely ground

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425°.
  • Stuff the cavity with lemon slices and truss.
  • Mix spices together and sprinkle over the bird in an even coat.
  • Bake at 425° for 10 minutes, then reduce the oven temperature to 385°.
    After a total of 40 minutes, baste the bird with its juices and return to the oven for another 30 minutes. When it registers 165° in the thigh, remove from heat and let rest for 15 minutes before carving.

Gwynnie’s Detox

I was first introduced to Gwenyth Paltrow as a cookbook author some many New Years’ Days ago (according to my records, it’s been only four years) at a friend’s house. One of the hosts’ sister was an editor at the publisher I think? Anyway, I poured over the simple layout, recipe ingredients, categorization, funny description of the “conscious uncoupling” between her and her kids’ daddy (something to do with Coldplay, I think?).

Since that NYD four years ago, I’ve obtained and filed away for reference three of her four* cookbooks and look to them at least once a week.

The Amazon-required links were terribly interruptive in my text, so here they are: one, two, three, four.

I began to learn about her brand, GOOP, and the contingent of folks who are staunchly against it. Jade eggs, luxurious and expensive week-long spa-like conferences where the color of your bracelet indicates the level of your monetary investment in the event, the $6,500 t-shirts, the brain dust and cordyceps required for the quintessential GOOP morning smoothie.

I’m not really sure how I feel about those things (except the smoothie—I had one this morning and it was pretty alright), but what I am sure of is that no one cares how I feel about those things.

All that is to say that I keep my interests on the food side of Gwyneth Paltrow, including the annual detox her team has published for the past few years.

I just completed my third and I think this one was the most effective, enjoyable, interesting, and easy of the three.

Effective: Because I mentally prepared, I wasn’t so stressed out about removing certain things from my routine, and I kept telling myself it was only five days and I wasn’t going to die without my single cup of coffee in the morning. That hot lemon water was no substitute, though.

Enjoyable: I was able to not only share the dinners with my partner, I found that the menu was tasty and got us to try a couple of new things.

Interesting: The red curry almond butter dressing/dip/sauce was very versatile and I actually liked the kelp noodles.

Easy: While each day required one or more of my myriad of kitchen implements, and used several bowls, plates, and containers, I have a partner who keeps up with dishes and, while his stamina was tested, this really helped make it easy.

If you follow the menu and shopping list (note that the list is missing both pitted dates and nori sheets), and think about how to substitute, and aren’t too hard on yourself for using agave nectar plus Bragg’s amino acids because you don’t want to spend $12 on 8 oz. of coconut aminos, then you can get through this.

If nothing else was learned, I liked her roasted chicken instructions and will use it frequently.

Get a 3-pound chicken, rub it all over with 1 tablespoon of salt (no oil necessary—the natural fat in the skin will render and keep the meat moist). Roast it in a 425°F oven for 1 to 1½ hours, until the internal temperature reaches 165°F and the juices run clear.

-goop
Red Curry Almond Butter Chicken Lettuce Cups turned Salad

I had to make the lunches easy on transportation and assembly, so the lettuce cups became a salad.

Roasted Sweet Pot, Two Ways

The sweet potato for breakfast happened twice in the five days and the first time (day two), I found it to be the most delicious thing I’d ever eaten. I must have been mildly delirious, because, by the second time (day four), it was not so amazing. But it was good.

Crunchy Salad

This salad took me over an hour to finish. I was determined to do so because I didn’t want to throw any of it out, and since I eat at my desk, it’s easy to dilly-dally the lunch meal.

Salmon and Spinach

We did The Big Shop before breakfast the Saturday before I started this adventure, so I was kind of hungry. This means that a recipe for 2 to 3, which calls for a 1.75 lb. salmon filet ended up being 2.25 lbs of salmon. I could not finish mine, but it. was. delicious.

Creamy Butternut Soup

The butternut squash soup came on the fourth night and was to be lunch on the fifth. It was really good and filling, with boiled cashews as the “cream”. If you’ve ever read Isa Chandra Moskowitz, then you know that vegans should Always Be Soaking [raw cashews] in the event of a creamy soup emergency. These did the trick, but I think I would have blended it for about 2 minutes longer. I was hungry, though.

So, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it! It was a good challenge, and I learned a couple of new tricks. I could probably piece together a summer version of a detox from the recipes in her cookbooks. She kindly labels them as Elimination Diet, Vegan, Protein-Packed, etc.

If you have the gumption, time, and support system, I recommend this as a personal challenge*.

*I am not a doctor, nutritionist, or expert in anything related to food or eating or diets. If you feel like you want to discuss this with a trained professional, then you probably should.